Understanding the Court Process / What to Expect at the Following Hearings

  • What is an Arraignment / First Appearance

An Arraignment is sometimes called a First Appearance.[1] If you did not have a Bail Hearing, then this is your first appearance in court. At this hearing, you have the option of appearing with a private attorney, applying for a public defender, or representing yourself. Click Here To Read More.

  • What is a Rule 8 Hearing

A Rule 8 Hearing is generally the second court appearance in Felony and Gross Misdemeanor cases. Some counties will not hold a Rule 8 Hearing unless you specifically request one. But if held, the hearing is meant to advise you of your rights for a second time. Click Here To Read More.

  • What is a Pre-Trial Hearing
  • What is an Omnibus Hearing

In Felony and Gross Misdemeanor cases, the Omnibus Hearing is the first time the court will ask you for a plea of guilty or not guilty. Before you do so, a plea offer is generally made for you to consider. Sometimes, these plea negotiations happen on the day of your Omnibus Hearing. Click Here to Read More.

  • What is a Contested Omnibus Hearing

Prior to your Omnibus Hearing, your attorney may file motions asking for a Contested Omnibus Hearing. Some courts may call it a Motion Hearing, Evidentiary Hearing, or Rasmussen Hearing. Regardless of the moniker, the purpose of such a hearing is to challenge issues in your case prior to a trial taking place. Click Here to Read More.

  • What is a Rasmussen Hearing

Rasmussen Hearings are hearings involving a request by the defense to suppress evidence prior to a trial. To get there, your defense attorney will file a motion asking the court for such relief based on an illegal seizure, illegal search, unlawful confession, or unlawful identification. Click Here to Read More.

  • What is a Settlement Conference

A Settlement Conference is an in-court hearing used to see if the prosecution and defense can reach a settlement prior to a trial taking place. By this point, the court has already conducted your first appearance, pre-trial hearing, and possibly contested hearings challenging the admissibility of evidence in your case.  Click Here to Read More.

  • What is a Morrissey Hearing
  • What is a Court Trial / Bench Trial
  • What is a Jury Trial

Understanding Bail and Bonds

  • How to get someone out of jail
  • When will bail get set
  • 36 / 48 hour rules

Understanding Driver’s License Revocations

  • What is an Implied Consent Hearing

Have you had your driver’s license taken away after being arrested for a DWI? If you had a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or more, or refused the evidentiary test, then you likely received a Notice and Order of License Revocation stating that your license to drive is being taken away. Click Here to Read More.

  • What is a Notice and Order of License Revocation

Upon a DWI arrest or conviction, you may have received a Notice and Order of License Revocation. This is an order stating that your driver’s license is being taken away for a period of time because of having a blood alcohol concentration of .08 or more, refusing an evidentiary test, or otherwise being convicted of a DWI at the end of your criminal case. Click Here to Read More.

Understanding License Plate Impoundment

  • What is a Notice and Order of License Plate Impoundment

If you received a Notice and Order of License Plate Impoundment, then it probably means you got a MN DWI with an alcohol concentration of .16 or more or you have a prior DWI within the past ten years. There are other scenarios that trigger license plate impoundment, such as Driving After Cancellation Inimical to Public Safety, but the aforementioned ones are the most common ways to get your license plates taken. Click Here to Read More.

Understanding Vehicle Forfeitures

  • What is a Notice and Intent to Forfeit Vehicle

Was your car taken away because of a DWI, controlled substance case, prostitution charge, fleeing a police officer, or for some other reason? If so, you likely received a Notice of Seizure and Intent to Forfeit Vehicle from the state. Most importantly, you must be aware you have sixty days to challenge your vehicle being taken away. Click Here to Learn More.

Levels of Offenses

  • Petty Misdemeanor
  • Misdemeanor
  • Gross Misdemeanor
  • Felony

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